Yukari, Not Your Japanese Girl Friend

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

Dawn's shisoYukari is a name of Japanese female . Another ‘yukari’ is a salty, sour and fragrant condiment made from purple shiso leaves. Shiso season, green or purple, is coming to end soon. Hope you made and enjoyed shiso juice (recipe is in the archive of this blog; August, 2013) to counter the heat of this hot summer. There is a reason to consume shiso during hot months. Shiso has antiseptic property; shiso alleviates pollen allergies; shiso strengthens our immune system; shiso relieves stress.

In the p...

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Join Me at ‘Fall 20015 Food & Wine Programs’ at Boston University

Category: Hiroko's Blog

HirokosAmericanKitchenCoverSMALLI have an additional honor and pleasure to participate in the Fall 2015 Food & Wine Programs at Boston University on October 22nd, Thursday.

The name, date, time of the event:

Hiroko’s American Kitchen, with Hiroko Shimbo

October 22nd, Thursday at 6pm

Please click and open the programs. http://www.bu.edu/foodandwine/common/pdfs/bu-seminars-brochure.pdf, This is the class for those who wants to learn how to incorporate Japanese flavors into your everyday menu, how to shop Japanese ingredients w...

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Who Cares Bitter Gourd?

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

goyachanpuru

Bitter gourd, niga-uri, which appears at my neighborhood Japanese food store during summer in New York City,reminds me of my visit to Okinawa, a southernmost, small island of Japan, many years ago. There I was first introduced to niga-uri during the height of the summer. Niga-uri is a savory gourd, which is deep green in color and has unique bumpy skin. The locals call it goya and it is known for its pleasant bitter flavor. Goya has been an important vegetable consumed by the Oki...

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How A Lake In Japan Supplies The World With Scallops

Category: Hiroko's Blog

This May I visited Hokkaido. One of the stories appeared on Zesterdaily.com. Please enjoy it!

“7.29.15 -

It began at 3 a.m., a bursting, loud, rumbling noise that broke the rural silence and my sleep. It came and went continuously. I couldn’t take it anymore and got up to investigate.

I was staying at a Japanese resort hotel next to Lake Saroma on the northeastern coast of the island of Hokkaido...

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Umeboshi Pickles

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

ume 1We say in Japan “One umeboshi a day keep the doctor away.” Pickled plum, umeboshi, which is salty and extremely sour, has many health benefit. Umeboshi is an alkaline food and rich in citric acid. One umeboshi a day maintains our blood pH at neutral. Citric acid in umeboshi dissolves lactic acid and helps our body to regain energy.

My sister, Yoko, is now enjoy making umeboshi, pickled plum in Tokyo. She began this annual ritual several years ago...

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Conch-This is The Way

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

Conch 1Happy Fourth of July. I purchased two conch at Blue Moon this Wednesday. My first question to the sales staff at the fishmonger was “how to remove the conch from the shell?”. The answer was straightforward simple. ‘Hit the shell with a large hammer several times until the shell breaks up.’, she advised me. Back at my home I searched the video showing ‘how to remove conch from the shell’. She was right. Every video shows the cracking method...

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Unique History in This Lovely Summer Dish

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

NambanNamban dish is a specific dish in which ingredients – seasonal small seafood to vegetables – are deep-fried and pickled in rice vinegar marinade, which is flavored with sugar and shoyu (Japanese soy sauce). In the olden days the method of this preparation was perfect to preserve the prepared food longer at the time when there was no refrigeration system. Namban preparation has survived into today’s kitchen and still entertain us with the height of the season vegetables and seafood.

Namban, by th...

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Amadai

Category: Hiroko's BlogRecipes

guji with fried vegLong time absence from my blog site.

Here is a wild and delicious dish idea using Blue Moon’s seasonal fish at this time of the year. Several years ago I found this fish during the height of the summer at Blue Moon. Since then, I have been enjoying it very much. The existence of this fish on this part of the water (East Coast) first surprised me. This fish is largely caught in Japan in the southern part of the main island and below. It is an expensive fish and is a Kyoto Kaiseki chefs’ favorite.

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Additional Ramen and Gyoza Class

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Deilcious ramen should be prepared at homemy ramen 1

Please come and enjoy to prepare the Ramen and Gyoza with me at in the kitchen at International Culinary Center, New York!

The class date is May 8th. Please visit the below site to sign up. I look forward to seeing you all.

http://www.internationalculinarycenter.com/courses/ramen-gyoza-with-hiroko-shimbo/

Best,

Hiroko

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5 Reasons Why Sake Is Best Served Warm

Category: Hiroko's Blog

How to pour sakeFor those who missed 5 Reasons Why Sake Is Best Served Warm (features as a leading article at MSN.com) at zesterdaily.com, here you are the article. When I recently toured Japan with Allison, John, Jane and Steve, they all enjoyed the warmed sake along with the cold one over delicious Japanese meals. Here is what you should know about how to maximize your experience with sake.

http://zesterdaily.com/drinking/5-reasons-sake-best-served-warm/

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