Monthly Archives October 2011

Want have a Ramen Party? Call us!

Category: Hiroko's Blog


Here at Progressive I conducted Ramen demonstrations and produced with Chef John Winpisinger and Chef Will one of the best ramens in America. Chef John followed my instructions and prepared a clean tasting, yet umami packed ramen broth. This was not the ordinary, porky and fatty version which has become the standard in New York City. We made shoyu ramen and miso ramen. The toppipngs are the indispensable chashu (simmered and flavored pork), egg, scallions...

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My baby/manuscript submitted

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Late last night I have submitted my manuscript (my third book) to my publisher Andrews McMeel Publishing. I felt like leaving my baby in the incubator at the publisher. Starting tomorrow editor-surgeons will apply all sort of surgeries (editing) to my baby to help her grow normal……..very worrisome!

My third book is all about how to enjoy Japanese meals in America using American ingredients – produces, large cut of meats (your favorite ribs is included), properly frozen fish – and Japanese cookin...

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Ramen, next star of Japanese food

Category: Hiroko's Blog

How many people knows ramen? I am not talking about instant ramen which is extremely cheap and convenient. They are not real ramen. It is exciting that recently ramen has become a next big star of Japanese food in America. New York City is already a battle ground of good ramen shops...

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Judith Jones

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Today I went to a party to celebrate Judith Jones’s retirement from Alfred Knopf. Her career lasted more than five decades working with noted authors such as John Updike, John Hersey, Elizabeth Bowen, Peter Taylor and Anne Tyler. When it comes to cookbook authors she worked with Julia Child, James Beard, Lidia Bastianish, Marcella Hazan, Madhur Jaffrey, Joan Nathan, Jacque Pepin and Claudia Roden. I am one of the very luckiest authors who can work with her. Here is her with me...

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Final day – scaling technique and nigirizushi

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Flounder is covered in very tiny scales, so scaling this fish requires a different technique, called, kokehiki, for which I use a very well sharpened yanagiba knife. Scaling is easier when the body of the fish is moist…that is, when fish is fresh and bathed in its natural moisture. Here I have a photo of Executive Sushi Chef Masato of 15 East demonstrating us how to do it properly. Other photos shows students working in very serious manner...

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Question received – sushi shoyu

Category: Hiroko's Blog

I received an e-mail question about my sushi shoyu recipe in The Sushi Experience from a person who enjoys the book. He says that “the amount of fish flakes instructed in the recipe was very large compared to the volume of shoyu and mirin, producing very little result. Is the recipe correct?” Thank you for the question. The recipe is correct, but I found one incorrect information in the recipe. Yield says 3 cups, but it produces only 2 cups. Sorry for this unpicked mistake...

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Fourth Day Essentials of Japanese Cuisine

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Preliminary form of sushi began its life in the northern part of present Thailand. It traveled to China and eventually arrived to Japan sometime at around 5th or 6th century. It took over thousand years for the preliminary sushi to transform to close to the present style of nigirizushi and rolls (not inside-out rolls)...

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Sardine…again

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Real Sardine

Real sardines for me mean the sardine with which I was raised – oily, sweet and flavorful. In Japan it is called ma-iwashi (you can learn more about it in my book The Sushi Experience). The head-to-tail size is about 10 inches. The very fresh sardine is plump (life in the nutrient rich cold water fatten them) in appearance and scales are intact. My mother always salt grilled them over a portable charcoal grill when I was small...

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Nimono braizing Day 3

Category: Hiroko's Blog

Today students learned the philosophy behind presenting dishes – Gomi, Goshoku, Goho, Ying & Yang, 70/30 and 60/40 rule….then produced simmered branzino, sake-braised short-ribs, simmered vegetables, salmon takikomi gohan and simmered hijiki and carrot. A great learning day and delicious foods – by students. Here are some photos.

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Essentials of Japanese Cuisine Day 1 and Day 2

Category: Hiroko's Blog

I am back on the Essentials of Japanese Cuisine teaching at French Culinary Institute. Day 1′s highlight was the preparation of dashi stock (requires a state of zen mind), fun home-made udon noodles and perfect tempura using seasonal vegetables. Here are some of the photos from the class. To roll the dough out I had to stand on a stand….short person’s dilemma. Everyone rolled out the udon dough into perfect thickness, resulting delicious cold udon dish (gomadare udon)...

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