CULINARY TOUR TO JAPAN, MARCH 2013

Posted on Oct 23, 2012 in Hiroko's Blog

Curiosity, learning about and sampling the local cuisines is always an important part of any visit to a foreign country. But for me food can be near the top of my list as a reason for the trip. On every trip I always visit the local food markets and sample as much of the cuisine as I can. This is because every item sold at the market is a mirror of the culture and society I am visiting. Each has its own history and story related to the culture, the society and the region....

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Culinary Tour to Japan, March 2012

Posted on Oct 22, 2012 in Hiroko's Blog

Curiosity, learning about and sampling the local cuisines is always an important part of any visit to a foreign country. But for me food can be near the top of my list as a reason for the trip. On every trip I always visit the local food markets and sample as much of the cuisine as I can. This is because every item sold at the market is a mirror of the culture and society I am visiting. Each has its own history and story related to the culture, the society and the region....

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Kaiseki continues – Menu Planning

Posted on Oct 18, 2012 in Hiroko's Blog

What Kaiseki chef or Japanese chef in general consider when he or she plans the menu are; 1. Seasonal ingredients, including seasonal herbs 2. Ingredients from water, river, mountain and field 3. Regional specialty food products 4. Five taste sensations 5. Five colors 6. Different temperature 7. Different texture 8. Bowls and dishes Bowls and plates in which a chef serves his or her prepared food plays a important role. They come in diverse variety in color, shape, depth,...

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HIROKO’S AMERICAN KITCHEN on FIND YOUR CRAVING

Posted on Oct 18, 2012 in Hiroko's Blog

Yesterday there was a book review on http://findyourcraving.com. The reviewer Nancy Matsumoto captured the essence of Hiroko’s American Kitchen. Thank you, Nancy. “Her idea is to take the best produce and other ingredients of America and cook them Japanese style, using a foundation of two stocks and four “mother sauces” made with basic Japanese products readily available to the home cook, such as soy sauce, mirin and sake. The results are...

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